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dogging en val d oise

Ici Mr est un complice de sa femme et n'a pas de rôle de cocu, il aime donner du plaisir à sa partenaire en lui permettant de voir ailleurs. Confiance, Amour Complicité dans le couple amateur de candaulisme.

dogging en val d oise

Messagepar chriscor1 » 31 Juil 2010, 17:53

bonjour, $ce soir ma femme voudrait tenter un dogging en foret, nous comme proches de la vallée de montmorency
quelq'un pourrait nous donner un endroit tranquille et sans risque?
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Re: dogging en val d oise

Messagepar emmaalain » 01 Aoû 2010, 01:14

chriscor1 a écrit:bonjour, $ce soir ma femme voudrait tenter un dogging en foret, nous comme proches de la vallée de montmorency
quelq'un pourrait nous donner un endroit tranquille et sans risque?


This is what the extraordinarily wonderful Oxford English Dictionary had to say about "dogging":

---Begin quotation
1. trans. a. To follow like a dog; to follow pertinaciously or closely; to pursue, track (a person, his footsteps, etc.), esp. with hostile intent. Also with out.
1519 W. Horman Vulg. 256 Our ennemyes+dogged vs at the backe [a tergo instabat]. 1601 Shakes. Twel. N. iii. ii. 81, I haue dogg'd him like his murtherer. 1676 Wycherley Pl. Dealer v. i, The Bayliffs dog'd us hither to the very door. 1750 Johnson Rambler No. 16 312 Eleven painters are now dogging me, for they know that he who can get my face first will make his fortune. 1834 Pringle Afr. Sk. viii. 257 A lion was+dogging us through the bushes the whole way home. 1843 ‘R. Carlton’ New Purchase II. 180 We'll dog out the rats now. 1851 Dixon W. Penn xxix. (1872) 272 Spies and informers dogged his footsteps. 1877 F. Ross et al. Gloss. Words Holderness 55 Dog-oot-ov, to obtain by persistent importunity. 1936 M. Allingham Flowers for Judge ix. 140 Someone murdered him very neatly indeed.+ Our astute friends+dogged that much out all right.

b. fig. Said of immaterial agencies.
1593 Shakes. Rich. II, v. iii. 139 Destruction straight shall dogge them at the heeles. 1634 Milton Comus 404, I fear the dread events that dog them both. 1795 Southey Joan of Arc v. 174 Famine dogs their footsteps. a1859 Macaulay Hist. Eng. (1861) V. 245 Envy such as dogged Montague through a long career.

†c. To haunt (a place, etc.). Obs. rare.
1600 Dr. Dodypoll iii. v. (Bullen O. Pl.), My mistresse dogs the banket, and I dog her. 1602 Marston Antonio's Rev. iii. v, Assume disguise, and dog the court In fained habit.

2. intr. or absol. To follow close. (In quot. 1694, to continue persistently or importunately.)
1519 W. Horman Vulg. 265 They cam doggynge at the tayle of our hoste. 1694 R. L'Estrange Fables cv. (1714) 121 To lie Dogging at his Prayers so Much and so Long. 1807 J. Moser in Spirit Pub. Jrnls. X. 7 Should constables dog at our heels. 1837 Wheelwright tr. Aristophanes I. 6, I+will not hold my tongue, Unless you tell me, why on earth we're dogging.

3. trans. To drive or chase with a dog or dogs; to set a dog on; fig. to hound or drive into.
1591 Bottesford (Linc.) Manor Rec. (MS.), Dogging beast vicinorum super communem pasturam. 1601 [see dogging below]. 1794 T. Stone Agric. Lincolnsh. 62 [Sheep] being over-heated in being+dogged to their confinement. 1840 H. Cleeve in Jrnl. Agric. Soc. I. iii. 298 Others have dogged the animal, and worried it to exhaustion. 1847 Bushnell Chr. Nurt. ii. ii. (1861) 264 He may dog his children possibly into some kind of conformity with his opinions.

4. To furnish or fill with dogs. (nonce-use.)
a1661 Fuller Worthies, Somerset (1811) II. 276 (D.) The ancient Romans, when first (instead of manning) they dogged their Capitol.

5. To act as a dog to, to guard as a dog. rare.
1818 Milman Samor i. 281 Ah generous King! That sets the emaciate wolf to dog the flock; The hawk to guard the dovecote.

6. a. To fasten or secure by means of a dog (see dog n.1 7a, e); also intr. to penetrate with a dog.
1591 in Glasscock Rec. St. Michael's, Bp. Stortford (1882) 65, iiij li. of leade to dog the stones together of ye steple windowe. 1879 Lumberman's Gaz. 15 Oct., We can dog directly into the hardest knot in the heaviest timber and hold the log perfectly safe and true. 1886 G. W. Hotchkiss in Encycl. Brit. XXI. 345/2 When the log reached the carriage it was dogged+by the simple movement of a lever.

b. To extract or uproot with a dog (dog n.1 7c).
1610 W. Folkingham Art of Survey i. ix. 21 Whynnes, Broome, &c.+being+rooted vp by dogging or grubbing.

c. Naut. To fasten, as a rope, to a spar or cable in such a way that the parts bind on each other, so as to prevent slipping.
1847 A. C. Key Recov. H.M.S. Gorgon 24 Another purchase was+lashed round the sheerhead+and its lower block was dogged on. 1867 Smyth Sailor's Word-bk., Dogged, a mode of attaching a rope to a spar or cable, in contradistinction to racking, by which slipping is prevented; half-hitched and end stopped back, is one mode.

†7. Oxford Univ. slang. (See quot., and collector 4.) Obs.
1726 Amherst Terræ Fil. xlii. 233 The collectors+having it in their power to dispose of all the schools and days in what manner they please+great application is made to them for gracious days and good schools; but especially to avoid being posted or dogged. Ibid., The first column and the last column+(which contain the names of those who are to come up the first day and the last day, and which is called posting and dogging) are esteemed very scandalous.

8. U.S. slang. Used in imprecations (perhaps sometimes with a reference to sense 3). Cf. dog on it (dog n.1 17j), dog-gone.
1860 Bartlett Dict. Amer., Dogged, a euphemistic oath; as, ‘I'll be dogged if I do it’. 1884 ‘Mark Twain’ [Clemens] Adv. H. Finn (Farmer Amer.), Why, dog my cats! there must have been a house-full o' niggers in there every night.

Hence "dogging ppl. a. See also dogging vbl. n.
1601 Cornwallyes Ess. i, They are commonly hawking, or dogging fellowes.

APPENDED FROM ADDITIONS 1993

dog, v. Add: 9. intr. With it. To act lazily or half-heartedly; to shirk or avoid responsibility, risk, etc.; to slack, idle. Also trans. slang (orig. and chiefly U.S.).
1905 R. Beach Partners (1912) i. 12, I expected to see the youngster dog it. 1928 R. J. Tasker Grimhaven xvi. 196 He hoped to goad me into action. ‘Go ahead and use that shiv—don't dog it—come on and do something.’ 1941 J. Lilienthal Horse Crazy 23 In Dellup's next race, Crump bet man-size money+. But the horse dogged it, the same as it had done before. 1966 H. Marriott Cariboo Cowboy xx. 189, I made up my mind I'd do little or nothing for quite a while+. So I just dogged it for several months. 1976 Billings (Montana) Gaz. 27 June 1-f/4 ‘I played aggressively for two or three holes, conservatively for 10 or 12 and the others I just dogged,’ Dickson said. 1983 A. Alvarez Biggest Game in Town vii. 100 Most guys playing for that kind of money will dog it, but Doyle's got no fear.
---End quotation

Which one of these numerous possible meanings, most of which involving the idea of "using a dog" in a way or another, is meant in your posting ?

Excellente soiree.
Alain
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Re: dogging en val d oise

Messagepar bergen » 02 Aoû 2010, 14:16

Peut etre en foret de l'isle adam. je sais qu'il si passe des choses ;-)
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Re: dogging en val d oise

Messagepar lobservateur » 04 Mai 2011, 08:32

emmaalain a écrit:
chriscor1 a écrit:bonjour, $ce soir ma femme voudrait tenter un dogging en foret, nous comme proches de la vallée de montmorency
quelq'un pourrait nous donner un endroit tranquille et sans risque?


This is what the extraordinarily wonderful Oxford English Dictionary had to say about "dogging":

---Begin quotation
1. trans. a. To follow like a dog; to follow pertinaciously or closely; to pursue, track (a person, his footsteps, etc.), esp. with hostile intent. Also with out.
1519 W. Horman Vulg. 256 Our ennemyes+dogged vs at the backe [a tergo instabat]. 1601 Shakes. Twel. N. iii. ii. 81, I haue dogg'd him like his murtherer. 1676 Wycherley Pl. Dealer v. i, The Bayliffs dog'd us hither to the very door. 1750 Johnson Rambler No. 16 312 Eleven painters are now dogging me, for they know that he who can get my face first will make his fortune. 1834 Pringle Afr. Sk. viii. 257 A lion was+dogging us through the bushes the whole way home. 1843 ‘R. Carlton’ New Purchase II. 180 We'll dog out the rats now. 1851 Dixon W. Penn xxix. (1872) 272 Spies and informers dogged his footsteps. 1877 F. Ross et al. Gloss. Words Holderness 55 Dog-oot-ov, to obtain by persistent importunity. 1936 M. Allingham Flowers for Judge ix. 140 Someone murdered him very neatly indeed.+ Our astute friends+dogged that much out all right.

b. fig. Said of immaterial agencies.
1593 Shakes. Rich. II, v. iii. 139 Destruction straight shall dogge them at the heeles. 1634 Milton Comus 404, I fear the dread events that dog them both. 1795 Southey Joan of Arc v. 174 Famine dogs their footsteps. a1859 Macaulay Hist. Eng. (1861) V. 245 Envy such as dogged Montague through a long career.

†c. To haunt (a place, etc.). Obs. rare.
1600 Dr. Dodypoll iii. v. (Bullen O. Pl.), My mistresse dogs the banket, and I dog her. 1602 Marston Antonio's Rev. iii. v, Assume disguise, and dog the court In fained habit.

2. intr. or absol. To follow close. (In quot. 1694, to continue persistently or importunately.)
1519 W. Horman Vulg. 265 They cam doggynge at the tayle of our hoste. 1694 R. L'Estrange Fables cv. (1714) 121 To lie Dogging at his Prayers so Much and so Long. 1807 J. Moser in Spirit Pub. Jrnls. X. 7 Should constables dog at our heels. 1837 Wheelwright tr. Aristophanes I. 6, I+will not hold my tongue, Unless you tell me, why on earth we're dogging.

3. trans. To drive or chase with a dog or dogs; to set a dog on; fig. to hound or drive into.
1591 Bottesford (Linc.) Manor Rec. (MS.), Dogging beast vicinorum super communem pasturam. 1601 [see dogging below]. 1794 T. Stone Agric. Lincolnsh. 62 [Sheep] being over-heated in being+dogged to their confinement. 1840 H. Cleeve in Jrnl. Agric. Soc. I. iii. 298 Others have dogged the animal, and worried it to exhaustion. 1847 Bushnell Chr. Nurt. ii. ii. (1861) 264 He may dog his children possibly into some kind of conformity with his opinions.

4. To furnish or fill with dogs. (nonce-use.)
a1661 Fuller Worthies, Somerset (1811) II. 276 (D.) The ancient Romans, when first (instead of manning) they dogged their Capitol.

5. To act as a dog to, to guard as a dog. rare.
1818 Milman Samor i. 281 Ah generous King! That sets the emaciate wolf to dog the flock; The hawk to guard the dovecote.

6. a. To fasten or secure by means of a dog (see dog n.1 7a, e); also intr. to penetrate with a dog.
1591 in Glasscock Rec. St. Michael's, Bp. Stortford (1882) 65, iiij li. of leade to dog the stones together of ye steple windowe. 1879 Lumberman's Gaz. 15 Oct., We can dog directly into the hardest knot in the heaviest timber and hold the log perfectly safe and true. 1886 G. W. Hotchkiss in Encycl. Brit. XXI. 345/2 When the log reached the carriage it was dogged+by the simple movement of a lever.

b. To extract or uproot with a dog (dog n.1 7c).
1610 W. Folkingham Art of Survey i. ix. 21 Whynnes, Broome, &c.+being+rooted vp by dogging or grubbing.

c. Naut. To fasten, as a rope, to a spar or cable in such a way that the parts bind on each other, so as to prevent slipping.
1847 A. C. Key Recov. H.M.S. Gorgon 24 Another purchase was+lashed round the sheerhead+and its lower block was dogged on. 1867 Smyth Sailor's Word-bk., Dogged, a mode of attaching a rope to a spar or cable, in contradistinction to racking, by which slipping is prevented; half-hitched and end stopped back, is one mode.

†7. Oxford Univ. slang. (See quot., and collector 4.) Obs.
1726 Amherst Terræ Fil. xlii. 233 The collectors+having it in their power to dispose of all the schools and days in what manner they please+great application is made to them for gracious days and good schools; but especially to avoid being posted or dogged. Ibid., The first column and the last column+(which contain the names of those who are to come up the first day and the last day, and which is called posting and dogging) are esteemed very scandalous.

8. U.S. slang. Used in imprecations (perhaps sometimes with a reference to sense 3). Cf. dog on it (dog n.1 17j), dog-gone.
1860 Bartlett Dict. Amer., Dogged, a euphemistic oath; as, ‘I'll be dogged if I do it’. 1884 ‘Mark Twain’ [Clemens] Adv. H. Finn (Farmer Amer.), Why, dog my cats! there must have been a house-full o' niggers in there every night.

Hence "dogging ppl. a. See also dogging vbl. n.
1601 Cornwallyes Ess. i, They are commonly hawking, or dogging fellowes.

APPENDED FROM ADDITIONS 1993

dog, v. Add: 9. intr. With it. To act lazily or half-heartedly; to shirk or avoid responsibility, risk, etc.; to slack, idle. Also trans. slang (orig. and chiefly U.S.).
1905 R. Beach Partners (1912) i. 12, I expected to see the youngster dog it. 1928 R. J. Tasker Grimhaven xvi. 196 He hoped to goad me into action. ‘Go ahead and use that shiv—don't dog it—come on and do something.’ 1941 J. Lilienthal Horse Crazy 23 In Dellup's next race, Crump bet man-size money+. But the horse dogged it, the same as it had done before. 1966 H. Marriott Cariboo Cowboy xx. 189, I made up my mind I'd do little or nothing for quite a while+. So I just dogged it for several months. 1976 Billings (Montana) Gaz. 27 June 1-f/4 ‘I played aggressively for two or three holes, conservatively for 10 or 12 and the others I just dogged,’ Dickson said. 1983 A. Alvarez Biggest Game in Town vii. 100 Most guys playing for that kind of money will dog it, but Doyle's got no fear.
---End quotation

Which one of these numerous possible meanings, most of which involving the idea of "using a dog" in a way or another, is meant in your posting ?

Excellente soiree.
Alain


tu veux nous faire voir que tu cause l'English? on s 'en fout et c e n'est pas poli de s'adresser à nous les bons Frenchies dans une autre langue que la nôtre
donc ton intervention est nulle et considéree comme non avenue, vas rejoindre les rosbifs plutôt !!!!
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Re: dogging en val d oise

Messagepar unimog68 » 04 Mai 2011, 08:34

excact
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Re: dogging en val d oise

Messagepar Baron31 » 04 Mai 2011, 10:09

il semblerait que le dogging soit simplement une pratique sexuelle exhibitionniste , une bonne et franche baise en public. Et que les pratiquantes soient des doggeuses …

Le sens premier anglais vient du fait que cette pratique attire les voyeurs en meute, souvent en remuant leurs queues.

Il existe plusieurs formes de dogging, Soit en voiture, soit en sous-bois :

EN voiture, souvent les fenêtres des voitures sont baissées pour permettre aux voyeurs rassemblés autour de bien se rincer l’oeil. Quelque fois même, une portières s’ouvre pour laisser entrer une 3ème personne, et c’est la que tout le plaisir du dogging extrème commence.

Le dogging est considéré par plusieurs comme un sport extrême, c’est le buzz d’aller jusqu’au bout et d’entrer en compétition avec les autres participants. En fait le dogging est un jeux sexuel illégal, puisqu’il constitue une infraction au code pénal, mais cette illégalité rajoute du sel à la pratique.

Une autre version est celle en pleine nature, elle est plus risquée, car permet moins facilement un contrôle des participants, et une disparition rapide en cas de problèmes.
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